Australia Day, Captain Cook and Australian ‘Invasion’

With Australia Day (January 26) fast approaching there is the distinct probability that any number of anti-European activities will take place.  It seems that the day celebrating the First Fleet landing in New South Wales and the beginnings of what was to become Australia has become the battleground over the ideological meaning of the event.

These events now bring into question meanings about the discovery of Australia and the immigrants that made Australia the place it is today.

The unfortunate aspect is that most Australians do not know the history of their own country and apparently gleefully grab at anything that appears in the media as truth and fact.  In writing about my own family, who arrived in Australia during 1850 to 1860 as did some seven million other immigrants, problematic.  Were my ancestors ‘settlers’, ‘explorers’, or, as popular opinion suggests, ‘invaders’?

For some reason Captain James Cook gets caught up in this battle concerning facts and fiction.  For this reason I am following up on something I had written previously which seems timely. which can be found here.

Richard Cornish – update

I have been prowling the web and the genealogical sites related to Cornwall seeking more information about Richard Cornish. Richard Cornish immigrated from Cornwall arriving in Melbourne on the SS Norfolk in 1862.

Negotiating the local parish records and the English General Register Office is challenging to say the least.  However, I have gleaned some valuable information concerning Richard Cornish’s parents, Samuel Cornish and Elizabeth Rogers Carter and their parents.

I would like to thank the Penwith Genealogy and their forum site for providing valuable information. Their help is appreciated.

The quick link to the update may be found here.

 

Regular and Irregular Marriage, Scotland 1800s

In the 1800s marriage in Scotland was more than a ‘wedding,’ an institution that has now lost much of its historical or religious significance.

Accessing the ‘hard’ documentary data concerning births, deaths, and marriage records is one thing, but appreciating the economic and social circumstance under which those lives were lived is another.  As a result there were marriages which were both ‘regular’ and irregular’.

In my latest contribution I look at the marriage process that existed in Scotland in the early 1800s which you can jump to here.

Blanks, Missing Records, and Other Defects ..

So what happens when the family researcher comes up with a blank, when the search engines return a ‘nil’ response?

The reaction can be unsettling to say the least.  But sometimes the way out is a simply email.  When I could not find a marriage certificate I finally contacted the national actives.  The result was welcome but also gives some insight why your best attempts to locate the missing data are not without good reason.

Read more here.

 

For the record ..

Following my last article, There are Records and then there are Records, I have been contacted by a reader who quite legitimately questioned my rationale behind a statement I made with reference to the birth of Susanna Ford.

The point of concern was the fact that the source upon which I was relying, that is the birth certificate of Susanna Ford, was in fact a ‘collective’ record rather than an ‘individual’ record of Susanna’s birth.  The point being made, how can I assert that such record is correct given the number of years between those who appear on the collective record?  This is a thoughtful question and deserve a considered response particular given the subject matter of the previous article.

My latest article may be accessed here.